POEM | A Short History of Hunger

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Fusarium wilt devoured the Gros Michel,

but Cavendish soon avenged
its brother’s death. You see, they were twins
in most respects. Yellow. Elongated. Soft.
Easy to disrobe.
Easy to digest.
Suited equally to toothless babies
and the toothless geriatric. The workers of Bandega too
had consumed it before the protest. Here and now
on fresh2home, It reincarnates itself as Robusta.
A lot of dying
finds Its remnants
in stomachs
since the First Word. Perhaps, it isn’t
so dissimilar to its history. Valued at 2 rupees a piece,
but carrying enough calories
to break the back
of the oldest beast
gnawing at intestines
surrounded
by a
brown,
sun-baked,
angry,
sweat-stained
body

so easy to disrobe, 
so easy to digest

by railway tracks,
         asphalt,        
heat.

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